Ongoing and Current Outreach

Winged Ambassador Education Program

The Winged Ambassador Education Partnership between Kure Atoll Conservancy, State of Hawaii DLNR-DOFAW, Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge, and Hawai‘i Pacific University have teamed up to offer free boluses as a valuable teaching resource.

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Please email Ilana Nimz:

WingedAmbassadors@oikonos.org.

The Kiamanu Project

The Kiamanu Project focuses on increasing community support for seabird conservation efforts through events and activities that bridge culture and science. Under the guidance of the Northwestern Hawaiian Island Native Hawaiian Cultural Work Group (CWG) — an advisory group to Papahānaumokuākea’s Monument Management Board--and their Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) Permit, the Kiamanu Project develops gathering and transport methods of salvage-appropriate seabirds within PMNM, manages the procurement, repositry, distribution, and provides educational opportunities and activities for the community around these resources.

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For More Info

Please email:

Hoku@Kureatollconservancy.org

Past Outreach Events

The Kiamanu Project

The Kiamanu Project focuses on increasing community support for seabird conservation efforts through events and activities that bridge culture and science. Under the guidance of the Northwestern Hawaiian Island Native Hawaiian Cultural Work Group (CWG) — an advisory group to Papahānaumokuākea’s Monument Management Board–and their Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) Permit, the Kiamanu Project develops gathering and transport methods of salvage-appropriate seabirds within PMNM, manages the procurement, repositry, distribution, and provides educational opportunities and activities for the community around these resources.

How Feathers Brought Communities Together

ARTICLE: Written by Mikiala Pescaia, Interpretive Ranger and Education Specialist, Kalaupapa National Park. During the Makahiki season of December 2018 Kalaupapa National Historical Park was asked to host a feather lei-making workshop for cultural practitioners primarily of the Molokai community. Its historical ties to featherwork and feather collection, its established seabird populations, as well as its ongoing efforts to increase suitable seabird habitat made Kalaupapa the ideal setting for this workshop. Photo Credit: Mikiala Pescaia

POSTER: Habitat Restoration Improves Nesting Habitat For Brown Boobies On Kure Atoll

Seasoned Kure field biologist and Hawaii Pacific University grad student Ilana Nimz presented her poster at the Hawaii Conservation Conference (Pictured above) about the removal of the highly invasive weed Verbesinan encelioides at Kure Atoll and the subsequent Brown and Masked Booby population increases. The Kure brown booby population increased